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Your questions answered

January 31, 2017

Your questions answered

You may be wondering where the College is headed and whether we are prepared to face the challenges that lie ahead for practicing allergists. We asked Michael Blaiss, MD, FACAAI, executive medical director, to share his thoughts.

Q: What do you consider to be the College’s most important challenges over the next 3-5 years and how will the College meet these challenges?

A: Health care will continue to undergo rapid changes in the United States, which will have a major impact on how allergists practice. It will be paramount for the College to stay abreast of all U.S. health care issues and be able to respond quickly with solutions for the practicing allergist. This is why we have a strong Advocacy Council with top-notch legal and lobbying expertise to ensure that national issues involving allergy are evaluated and addressed rapidly.  The challenge of MACRA and new Medicare payment models could lead to major changes in allergy reimbursement. The College is taking the lead in developing an alternative payment model for asthma to help you give your asthma patients the best possible care. With the explosion of telehealth in the U.S., the College will evaluate how best to prepare the membership to add these services to their practice. The changes in MOC will affect all board certified allergists, so the College will develop programs through the Education Council to meet the members’ needs. We must deal with the problem of allergist burnout in practice. Our Task Force on Physician Well–being will tackle this growing problem. The compounding issue will continue to be a major challenge in clinical allergy. The College will do whatever it takes to fight for the practicing allergists ability to prepare and administer allergy immunotherapy in their office settings. We know more challenges will develop in the near future, and the College is committed to address these head on for you. You as council/committee members are paramount in bringing any challenges you see to the attention of the College as we all work together in solving issues and moving allergy forward.

Q: What are the College’s strengths? What sets us apart from other organizations?

A: The singular mission of the College is fighting for the practicing allergist. Every project and activity of the College is directed to ensuring you can do what you do best – providing quality care for your patients. Our educational endeavors provide the best in clinical, cutting-edge information that can be used in your day-to-day practice of allergy. All our advocacy initiatives are geared toward protecting your ability to care for your patients. Our practice management programs and resources give you the tools to be successful in your everyday practice.

Our major strength is you. With the launch of Vision 2020, we have given and will continue to give more and more members an active role in the College. Our new College Leadership Summit will help to train the future leaders of our organization. Our council/committee structure will continue to get more allergists into the process of shaping the College and developing projects for the membership. All members can now propose programs for our Annual Scientific Meeting. An organization is only as strong as its membership. Through Vision 2020, the College is working hard to make our organization user-friendly and relevant to your clinical practice.

Have more questions?

Perhaps you’d like to learn more about the College’s stand on an issue that is important to you and your practice. Or you have a question about a specific priority area of the Vision 2020 initiative. Dr. Blaiss is glad to take your questions and provide his perspective.

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